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Bring your own device to work: Passing trend or the future of IT?

SearchCIO.com's second tweet jam Feb. 27 revealed that the bring your own device to work trend isn't likely to dissolve anytime soon but will be an ongoing security concern for IT leaders.

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And, as such, bring your own device (BYOD) policies will continue to be a priority.

The first question @searchcio posed to Twitter followers in this month's Twitter discussion was:

Most tweet jam participants agreed that bring your own device to work trends are a concern for organizations, but that developing super-strict policies for personal devices might not be the best way to strategize around security. Tweet jammers initiated conversations around common BYOD anxieties, including the question of whether to ask employees to surrender preferred mobile devices in exchange for a scaled-down number of devices that organizations are willing to pay for and support:

As the conversation deepened, a new question was raised: "How does ownership play a role in security for this BYOD mobility trend?" Several tweet jammers said that any security plan worth its salt is only as good as the users -- i.e., the company's employees. But what role should ownership of the device play in establishing a mobile policy around bring your own device to work?

The ownership discussion continued, taking a turn down a different path. Not every tweet jam participant agreed that device ownership should define BYOD policies, suggesting "data ownership" would be a better focus:

Device preferences and device ownership were not the only topics for discussion in the BYOD segment of our tweet jam. Some participants did note that the bring your own device to work buzzword is part of the larger mobile trend and simply needs to be part of a larger mobility management program:

But many are still specifically concerned with BYOD policy-making:

There is a lot left to say about bring your own device to work trends and policy prioritization. Visit Twitter for a full run-down of February's tweet jam discussion and sound off with your thoughts in the comments section below.

Stay tuned for additional recaps from SearchCIO.com's February tweet jam about mobility, and follow @searchCIO on Twitter to be notified about upcoming Twitter conversations.

This was first published in March 2013

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Expert Discussion

Are BYOD policies a major concern for CIOs or a fizzling priority?

Emily McLaughlin, Assistant Site Editor
What's your opinion?
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