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Waking up to benefits of copy data management software

Have you ever spaced out during a meeting only to come to after hearing something arresting — a proposal or possibility that might really affect how you do your job? Rosetta Stone’s Mark Moseley has — and it led to his purchase of copy data management software.

Moseley is vice president of IT at the language-learning company, which overhauled its business from shipping compact discs that teach Italian, French, Chinese and other tongues to offering courses online, which people can access on their PCs or smartphones.

Rosetta Stone’s growing number of online offerings resulted in an explosion in the amount of data that has to be stored. In fact, Moseley said, he was running out of floor space in his data center for servers that could hold all the data.

A big piece of the problem was a profusion of copy data — that’s the duplicate copies of data that backup software and other applications churn out and then stash on physical servers.

Copy that

Meanwhile, Rosetta Stone salespeople were pitching language-learning software to a technology company called Actifio. Its trade? Making software to deal with overflowing copy data. But copy data management software wasn’t the main reason Moseley agreed to a meeting with the Actifio folks.

“It was a favor really to our sales team,” Moseley said. “I didn’t care. I was mostly zoned out of the meeting.”

Then an Actifio sales rep mentioned being able to very quickly create a clone of Oracle Database — a separate copy of the database management system software and the business data — in just a few minutes.

“I’m like, ‘What?'” Moseley said. Rosetta Stone’s enterprise resource planning system runs on Oracle. “The cloning process for us would be days.”

Moseley was rapt, asking questions and imagining being able to swiftly clone his test and development environments, too. That would help his developer team move lithely from one project to the next.

For example, Moseley said, if there’s a problem in an application’s production environment — the one users use — developers could quickly spin up a cloned environment and fix the problem there.

Another scenario: “You’re in the middle of developing something. You hit an anomaly; you blow up your environment. We’ve got a deadline. I can’t wait two or three days I need a new one now.”

Recipe for disaster recovery

Then Moseley saw other benefits the copy data management software could have for his IT operations: Actifio’s cloud-based application lets him virtualize his data, hardware platforms and storage and backup applications. That allows him to store less data.

Actifio also lets Moseley set up disaster recovery sites in the cloud — a huge boon.

“I don’t know how often most companies have disasters, but we don’t have them very often, and we don’t have the money to spend on having a completely new disaster recovery site set up,” Moseley said.

“However, with this platform I can very cheaply and easily have a disaster recovery site set up in the cloud ready to go. It’s costing me almost nothing — until I have to use it.”

That gives Moseley a sense of security that he can then present to Rosetta Stone’s customers, who share their contact information with the company.

That’s now. Back during the sales pitch — after being shaken from indifference — Moseley started piecing together “all of the different things that I can do with this platform and I’m hooked. And really it all started with just talking a little bit about Oracle.”

Mark Moseley talks about Rosetta Stone’s digital transformation strategy in this SearchCIO interview.

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Nice Case study, I find that customers always choose based off of the recovery.
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Copy Data Managment is just a buzzword/marketing term. At the end it is about using secondary copies/backups for more things than just disaster/restores that rarely occurs. This can be applied to traditional backup software or to SAN replication copies/snapshots, etc

Unitrends has been doing this for some time also, you can use backups to provide your developers and instant copy of a VM, file, or database so they can test a new patch, a schema change or a new software over the exact copy of the production data without affection production or duplicating/cloning/wasting more space.

This can be driven by UI or REST APIs or powershell so developer can restore every day latest copy:

http://blogs.unitrends.com/automate-multiple-instant-recoveries-backups-using-powershell/

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Technology is an awesome enabler of a lot of business, and making instant replicas is definitely awesome when used correctly.
In generel you need to consider af complete storage and recovery strategy and see what helps you the best.
Sometimes it will be SAN's which can do these things or a backup solution.
Unitrends has created a suite of helpfull free tools to assist in assessing your disaster recovery strategy or the full scope of your data etc.
Partially in Danish, most of this is in english though and explains and links to these tools.
http://mikla-it.dk/index.php/category/storage/disaster-recovery/
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Well, is having a DR plan on the cloud that cheap ? I'm not really sure... I'd like to have a similar plan for my company, and my biggest concern is the price
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